Posted by: morgan1965 | February 19, 2012

Rev. Charles Tindley: An Extraordinary Minister

On a recent February Sunday afternoon, I attended a program that was listed as “a typical Tindley church service.” The program was produced and conducted by my sister, Celestine Lyght at the Chippey African Union Methodist Church in Hokessin, Delaware. 

Ms. Lyght describes The Rev. Charles Albert Tindley (1851-1933) as a “phenomenal preacher, prolific hymnist and extraordinary singer.”  He served as pastor of the Tindley Temple United Methodist Church (named after Charles Tindley) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His music has inspired people of many denominations over the decades since his death. 

This inspiring program featured Rev. Gary Meekins, guest preacher; guest soloists, Mrs. Antoinette Davis and Mrs. Mildred Hamilton; and Mr. Joe Smithers, trumpet. There were also two dramatic skits. The first skit featured three men who reminisced about their lives before coming to Tindley Temple and after becoming immersed in the ministry of Rev. Tindley. They were grateful for the fact that their lives had been transformed by the Tinley Temple ministry. A second skit shared the reflections of a woman who was preparing to go to church at Tindley Temple to hear Rev. Tindley preach and to share in the prayer time. The woman always made sure that she was spiritually prepared to go to church. When she arrived at church she was ready to receive the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. 

The opening hymn was “Leave It There.” This prayer hymn teaches us to take our burdens to the Lord and leave them there. Tindley knew that we cannot resolve our own burdens, but God can overcome our troubles. It is a matter of trusting in God. The next two selections help the pilgrim disciple to grow in his/her trust of Jesus. The first selection, “Let Jesus Fix It For You,” which reminds me that I need not attempt to fix what God is willing and able to fix on my behalf. One example of this notion is that I always keep my AAA membership current. If I have a flat tire, I call them and they fix it. Oh yes, I have had a few occasions when I called AAA.  I have learned regularly to call on Jesus, because I know that he will fix it for me and you. 

The second selection, “Nothing Between My Soul and the Savior,” tells me that I cannot allow anything to get between me and my Lord. There cannot be any kind of interference that might interrupt one’s relationship with Jesus. 

Such a relationship with Jesus requires that one believe in God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit.  Another selection was titled, “I Believe It.” Tindley conveys the belief that Jesus died to set us free. Do you believe this? If we believe this, then we are called to live a life that reflects our belief in the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. 

It was appropriate to attend such a program during Black History Month, February. Charles Tinldey, an African American, was a distinguished Methodist pastor who ministered to the whole community. He is an important part of the fabric of American history. 

The program ended with the gathered congregation singing “We Shall Overcome.” It was Tindley’s song, “I Shall Overcome Someday,” that inspired this famous civil rights song. 

Let us be inspired in our belief in God and our desire to make this world a better place for all of God’s people. Together we shall overcome! 

On a recent February Sunday afternoon, I attended a program that was listed as “a typical Tindley church service.” The program was produced and conducted by my sister, Celestine Lyght at the Chippey African Union Methodist Church in Hokessin, Delaware. 

Ms. Lyght describes The Rev. Charles Albert Tindley (1851-1933) as a “phenomenal preacher, prolific hymnist and extraordinary singer.”  He served as pastor of the Tindley Temple United Methodist Church (named after Charles Tindley) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His music has inspired people of many denominations over the decades since his death. 

This inspiring program featured Rev. Gary Meekins, guest preacher; guest soloists, Mrs. Antoinette Davis and Mrs. Mildred Hamilton; and Mr. Joe Smithers, trumpet. There were also two dramatic skits. The first skit featured three men who reminisced about their lives before coming to Tindley Temple and after becoming immersed in the ministry of Rev. Tindley. They were grateful for the fact that their lives had been transformed by the Tinley Temple ministry. A second skit shared the reflections of a woman who was preparing to go to church at Tindley Temple to hear Rev. Tindley preach and to share in the prayer time. The woman always made sure that she was spiritually prepared to go to church. When she arrived at church she was ready to receive the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.

 The opening hymn was “Leave It There.” This prayer hymn teaches us to take our burdens to the Lord and leave them there. Tindley knew that we cannot resolve our own burdens, but God can overcome our troubles. It is a matter of trusting in God. The next two selections help the pilgrim disciple to grow in his/her trust of Jesus. The first selection, “Let Jesus Fix It For You,” which reminds me that I need not attempt to fix what God is willing and able to fix on my behalf. One example of this notion is that I always keep my AAA membership current. If I have a flat tire, I call them and they fix it. Oh yes, I have had a few occasions when I called AAA.  I have learned regularly to call on Jesus, because I know that he will fix it for me and you.

 The second selection, “Nothing Between My Soul and the Savior,” tells me that I cannot allow anything to get between me and my Lord. There cannot be any kind of interference that might interrupt one’s relationship with Jesus. 

Such a relationship with Jesus requires that one believe in God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit.  Another selection was titled, “I Believe It.” Tindley conveys the belief that Jesus died to set us free. Do you believe this? If we believe this, then we are called to live a life that reflects our belief in the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. 

It was appropriate to attend such a program during Black History Month, February. Charles Tinldey, an African American, was a distinguished Methodist pastor who ministered to the whole community. He is an important part of the fabric of American history. 

The program ended with the gathered congregation singing “We Shall Overcome.” It was Tindley’s song, “I Shall Overcome Someday,” that inspired this famous civil rights song.

 Let us be inspired in our belief in God and our desire to make this world a better place for all of God’s people. Together we shall overcome!

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: